Create Diagnostics against Equipment

The document explains how you create diagnostics against equipment records.

This document explains how diagnostics is created in 'Error Code 2. Connect to Equipment' (MMS237). It is however possible to create an additional level in 'Error Code 3. Connect to Equipment' (MMS234). The procedure is identical and no separate instruction is created for this.

Outcome

The equipment record has a diagnostics structure connected to it. This contains the following information

The results can be used to improve plant availability by minimizing downtime.

A repair service that is linked to the equipment and the error code can be triggered from 'Work Request. Quick Entry' (MOS185).

Before You Start

Follow These Steps

Define functional failure

The error code structure can either be entered manually or automatically. Automatic update will be done if parameter 18 in 'Settings - WO Operation Reporting' (MOS991/990) is selected.

  1. Start 'Model/Site. Browse' (MOS446) and enter the site in which the equipment is installed.

  2. Highlight the equipment record and select option 10=Diagnostics to display 'Error Code 1. Connect to Equipment' (MMS238/B).

    This program may also be reached from the menu.

  3. Enter a valid error code and select New to display the E panel.

  4. Edit the name and description if the defaulted are not correct. Press Enter to finish.

    The fields for product, structure type and service can be left blank.

Define failure modes and effects

  1. Highlight the error code which is to be further defined in 'Error Code 1. Connect to Equipment' (MMS238/B) and select option 11='Error Code 2' to display 'Error Code 2. Connect to Equipment' (MMS237).

  2. Set panel sequence E and sorting order 1.

  3. Select error code 2 and select New to display the E panel.

  4. Change the name and the description if the defaulted ones from the error code are not correct.

  5. Enter a responsible for the analysis, a consequence class and, if applicable, a subclass.

    The consequence class and subclass can be entered manually, or selected by the system. If you want to have these fields entered automatically, you need to press F14=Diagnostics. This will start 'Consequence Analysis. Display' (MCS130). The analysis consists of a set of questions that help set the correct consequence class.

    Press Finish when you have answered the final question. The consequence class and subclass will be brought back to the corresponding fields in (MMS237).

  6. Enter the downtime that is estimated when a failure occurs, if this value is not to be automatically calculated.

  7. Enter the mean time between failure, if this value is not to be automatically calculated.

  8. Press Enter to save.

Develop preventive and corrective service

Having performed the consequence analysis to decide how significant the failure is, you can proceed with creating a preventive service to avoid the failure in the future, or at least to reduce its effects to an acceptable level.

It is also possible to develop a service to repair the failure once it has occurred.

These services are developed in 'Service. Open' (MOS300). When they are defined, costing should be done in 'Product Costing. Calculate Service' (PCS235).

  1. Open the record that was just created in (MMS237) to display the E panel.

  2. Enter the preventive and corrective service in the corresponding fields and press Enter to save.

    When you open the record again, you should have a complete set of data with information about the costs for preventing the failure and the costs for correcting the failure once it has occurred. This information should be of assistance when you decide how to address the problem that is described with the error code in question.

    The cost of failure is calculated as downtime x downtime cost + repair cost.

    The cost of prevention is calculated based on the cost of the service over the same period as the MTBF. If a failure has a MTBF of three years and the preventive service has an interval of six months, the system will calculate how many times the service will be performed during the three years of the MTBF and then multiple the cost of each service with the number of times it will be performed.

    It is acceptable to use a preventive service that is more expensive than the corrective service, for example when safety and environmental issues can be avoided.

    It is also possible to consider additional statistics before finally deciding what maintenance strategy to use. Statistical information can be reached by pressing F15=Statistics to display 'Maint Stats. Display/Position' (MCS420).

Parameters to Set

Program ID/ Panel Field The field indicates …
(MMS238/B) Error code 1 ... the highest error code in the error code structure. Error code 1 normally describes a major failure that can occur on an equipment.
(MMS237/B) Error code 2 ... the second level in the error code structure. If error code 1 describes a total equipment failure, error code 2 could be a more specific description, for example indicating a specific part within the equipment that failed.
(MMS237/E) Consequence class

... a user defined consequence class. This normally places the failure into one of the following groups: hidden, safety, operational or non-operational.

This code can be manually selected, or selected by running the consequence analysis in 'Consequence Analysis. Display' (MCS130). This program is reached by pressing F14.

(MMS237/E) Consequence subclass ... the consequence subclass. The subclass can be defined to describe the consequence class in greater detail. A safety problem can have subclasses for environmental safety problems, risks for personal injury etc.
Preventive
(MMS237/E) Product, structure type, service ... the product number that is used together with a structure type and a service ID. This combination indicates the steps that can be taken to prevent the failure from occurring.
Corrective
(MMS237/E) Product, structure type, service

... the product number that is used together with a structure type and a service ID. This combination indicates the steps that can be taken to correct the failure once it has occurred.

The service that is entered here can be defaulted in 'Work Request. Quick Entry' (MOS185) if the error code to which it is linked is used.

(MMS237/E) Downtime ... the estimated number of hours downtime encountered when this failure occurs. This is used to make a comparison between the cost of the failure and the cost of prevention. This value can be calculated automatically, this can be configured within the statistics parameters in 'Settings - Maintenance Statistics' (MCS390).
(MMS237/E) Downtime cost

... the cost that is estimated as a result of the loss in production when the equipment is not running.

The field displays the cost that is entered in 'Equipment/Serialized Item. Open' (MMS240).

(MMS237/E) Repair cost ... the estimated cost of the repair when the failure occurs. This cost would normally include labor, materials, contractors etc. This is used to make a comparison between the cost of the failure and the cost of prevention. It is likely this will be calculated manually until additional statistics can be established. After this time the system can calculate it when 'Maint Stats. Create' (MCS300) is run (if (MCS390) is configured to do this).
(MMS237/E) Prevention cost ... the cost of doing regular maintenance in order to prevent a failure. It is calculated based on the cost of the service, including materials and labor multiplied by the frequency of the service over the same period of time as the mean time between failures (MTBF).
(MMS237/E) Mean time between failure ... the Mean Time Between Failure. This is used to make a comparison between the cost of the failure and the cost of prevention over the same period. This value can be manually entered or be calculated automatically. Automatic calculation can be configured within the statistics parameters in 'Settings - Maintenance Statistics' (MCS390). It is likely this will not be calculated manually until additional statistics can be established.
(MMS237/E) Failure cost

... the cost of failure.

The failure cost is calculated by multiplying the downtime by the downtime cost, then adding the repair cost.

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