Defining Services to Describe the Jobs that are Performed on an Object

This document explains the two methods you can use to define services that contain the different jobs that exist within your maintenance organization. The service contains information about each job that you can perform and on what machines you can perform the job.

The document also explains how you define the operations and the materials that are connected to a service. Some related service information is also described.

Use this process when you want to define new services or when you want to make changes to old ones. You need to define new services when you or your customers have purchased new maintenance objects. Changes in existing services are performed if, for example, a maintenance interval is changed or a new spare part is introduced.

Note: You can also create a new service by copying an existing work order, including changes made on the work order.

See Create a Service by Copying a Work Order.

Outcome

A service for either an object or a general service is defined, the location where the service will be performed, what materials will be used, how long it will take to perform, and how many workers will be required is specified.

A work order is always based on a service. A service can be converted into work orders in these ways:

A service can be linked to maintenance objects. This means that a service will automatically be suggested when the object should be serviced.

Information about services is stored in these files:

Before you start

Follow these steps to define new service - standard entry

This entry method is usually used when the system is configured for maintenance of components, for example aircraft, trains, and buses.

  1. Define Basic Service Data

    Define services in 'Service. Open' (MOS300/EF). When you define a service, you specify basic service information such as the validity dates for the service, how often and a planned service should be performed and how it should be scheduled, which facility the service should be connected to, which order type the service should use, the rules for planning the work, and how comprehensive the service is.

    You can also specify service revisions, warranties, and grouping criteria for each service.

  2. Connect Operations

    The different steps in a service are described in 'Product. Connect Materials/Operations' (PDS002). Each service can consist of several smaller jobs. For example, a repair of a pump may consist of three steps. First the pump needs to be cleaned, then taken apart, and put back together.

    For each step, you also specify the work center in which the work is performed, the time it takes to perform the work, and the skill required.

    You can describe each step by its elements. This is done in 'Operation. Connect Operation Elements' (PDS027). The operation element level is also used to connect tools, skills, drawings, and permits to an operation.

  3. Connect Materials or Spare Parts

    The material used in each service is also described for each operation in (PDS002). For example, a regular car service might use engine oil, spark plugs, and brake pads. Some of these materials might be held in stock, while others might have to be purchased.

Follow these steps to define new service - quick entry

This entry method is usually used when the system is configured for plant maintenance.

  1. Define Basic Service Data

    Define services in 'Service. Open' (MOS300/H) when using quick entry. When you define a service, you specify basic service information such as the validity dates for the service, how often a planned service should be performed according to the default meter, how it should be scheduled, which facility the service should be connected to, which order type the service should use, and the rules for planning the work.

    You also define the work center in which the job will be performed, the planned run time of the job, and optional alarm limits and trend limits.

  2. Connect Materials or Spare Parts

    The material used in each service is also described for each operation in (PDS002). For example, a regular car service might use engine oil, spark plugs, and brake pads. Some of these materials might be held in stock, while others might have to be purchased.

Additional service data

This section describes some of the related data that can be connected to services using the available related options in (MOS300). See related documents under the See also section.

Service level

The service level is a way to describe how comprehensive a service is. The service level is used together with the calculation method to determine how future service requirements are calculated.

The valid service levels are:

0 = No service level

1-9 = Service level used and level 1 is the highest controlling level.

The maintenance interval for a service is recalculated when another service of a higher service level is performed. The calculation method determines how this calculation is performed.

Example:

Service

Service level

Maintenance level

Minor

5

300 hours

Major

1

1000 hours

In the example, the major service is more comprehensive than the minor service and is assigned level 1. When the major service is performed, it can affect the planning of minor services with a higher service level. A typical result is shown in the next example.

Service

Planned

Service

Planned

Minor

300 hours

Major

1000 hours

Minor

600 hours

Major

2000 hours

Minor

900 hours

Major

3000 hours

Minor

1300 hours

Major

4000 hours

Since the major service is performed every 1,000 hours, the minor service will not need to be performed until 300 hours after the major service (at 1,300 hours).

Calculation method

The calculation method determines how the service is affected by other services and service levels.

The valid alternatives are:

0 = This service does not affect the calculation of the next service. This option should only be used for services without a maintenance interval.

1 = This service is only affected by more comprehensive services. A level 5 service is reset by services with level 4, 3, 2, and 1.

2 = This service is affected by services with the same level and services with a higher service level. A level 5 service is reset by services with level 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1.

3 = This service is not affected by other services and levels. Note that if alternative 3 is selected, the service level must be set to 9.

Adjustment code

The adjustment code determines how the next scheduled service is affected by the most recent service if it was performed prior to, or after, its original planned date. The next service can be adjusted to keep the maintenance interval and be moved to an earlier or a later point according to the service planning meter.

Maintenance intervals are usually defined according to calendar time or another accumulative meter.

The valid alternatives are:

0 = Maintain the original schedule and ignore the completion date of the previous service. A service that is planned to be performed each Monday will always fall out on the Monday, regardless of when the previous service was reported.

1 = Allow the next service to be rescheduled earlier or later based on the completion date of the previous service (float permitted both earlier and later). In this case the maintenance interval will always be kept. If a service has an interval of seven days, the next service will be planned seven days after the previous service was reported.

2 = As alternative 1, but only allow the next service to be rescheduled to an earlier date (float permitted to an earlier date). If the previous service is performed earlier than its planned date, the next service will be moved to an earlier date and the interval will be kept. If the previous service is reported later than its planned date, the next service will fall out on its original planned date and the maintenance interval will be shorter.

3 = As alternative 1, but only allow the next service to be rescheduled to a later date (float only permitted to a later date). If the previous service is reported earlier than its planned date, the next service will fall out on its original planned date and the maintenance interval will be longer. If the previous service is reported later than its original planned date, the next service will be moved to a later date and keep the maintenance interval.

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